Hair Tips: from Brass to Beauty

Hair Tips: from Brass to Beauty

When your new beautiful and glistening blonde hair becomes a brassy color, don’t panic! This is a phase that everyone who lightens their hair experiences. You’ll know your hair becomes brassy when you start noticing an undesired yellow, red or orange tone appearing after bleaching.

Brassy hair is part of a chemical lightening process that enters into your hair shafts and reacts with the melanin pigment molecules to break them down and lift color from your hair. In order for hair to get the light tone you desire, the bleach must break down all of the dark pigment molecules in your strands which can take more than one try. Among the red, yellow and blue pigment molecules that hair contains, the blue molecules usually dissolve faster which leaves your hair with unwanted warm tones. You can see more brassiness in darker hair color because it’s more challenging to remove the underlying pigment.

So How Do You Fix Brassy Hair? Thankfully, there are ways we can save brassy hair.

Purple Shampoo

Purple shampoo is everyone’s go-to after dying their hair into a lighter color. This type of shampoo is used to help achieve the natural blonde, platinum, silver/gray, white, or pastel tone you’re looking for. It’s going to help deplete the warm and off-color tone that makes your hair look brassy. We recommend that you start using a pea-sized amount of purple shampoo at least once a week to soften the tone.

Heat Protectants

You must protect your hair from the sun because it's known to fade the color of your hair. Your hair is already weak and vulnerable from all of the chemicals in the bleach and the last thing you want is to not receive the beautiful hair color you always wanted. Did you know that the pigment molecules in your hair also provide protection? It’s true when your hair is in the sun, the pigments absorb and filter radiation and are broken down in the process. This is why your hair bleaches from sunlight!

While you can’t fully prevent your hair from sun exposure, you can still protect your hair with heat protectant sprays. Here are our favorites:

      • Coconut Oil (high in saturated fat)
      • Macadamia Nut Oil (high in fatty acid: omega 3 and omega 6)
      • Argan Oil (high in Vitamin E)
      • Olive Oil (rich in monounsaturated fats)

Avoid Chlorine

Depending on your hair condition, try to stay away from swimming until the dye has fully settled in. There's a chance that if chlorine comes into contact with your hair, it can leave behind a greenish shade color. This happens because chlorine has a high amount of copper in the water and it ends up sticking to your hair shafts and changing the reflective properties of the hair.